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1984 Quotes, Nineteen Eighty-Four Quotes , Part 1 Chap 1 - Part 2 Chap 4
Related Quotes:   Animal Farm
1984 Part 2, Chapter 5 - Part 3, Chapter 6 More Nineteen Eighty-Four quotes
It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen.
1984 (Nineteen Eighty-Four)
Opening line of novel, Part 1, Chapter 1.
BIG BROTHER IS WATCHING YOU.
1984 (Nineteen Eighty-Four)
Caption to Ingsoc poster, described as "one of those pictures which are so contrived that the eyes follow you about when you move", Part 1, Chapter 1.
WAR IS PEACE
FREEDOM IS SLAVERY
IGNORANCE IS STRENGTH.
1984 (Nineteen Eighty-Four)
Ingsoc party slogan, Part 1, Chapter 1.
A hideous ecstasy of fear and vindictiveness, a desire to kill, to torture, to smash faces in with a sledgehammer, seemed to flow through the whole group of people like an electric current, turning one even against one's will into a grimacing, screaming lunatic.
1984 (Nineteen Eighty-Four)
Describing the "Two Minutes Hate", Part 1, Chapter 1.
One of those completely unquestioning, devoted drudges on whom, more even than on the Thought Police, the stability of the Party depended.
1984 (Nineteen Eighty-Four)
Parsons a fellow employee of Winston at Ministry of Truth, Part 1, Chapter 2.
We shall meet in the place where there is no darkness.
1984 (Nineteen Eighty-Four)
What O'Brien said to Winston in a dream, Part 1, Chapter 2.
The past was dead, the future was unimaginable.
1984 (Nineteen Eighty-Four)
Part 1, Chapter 2.
With its grace and carelessness it seemed to annihilate a whole culture, a whole system of thought, as though Big Brother and the Party and the Thought Police could all be swept into nothingness by a single splendid movement of the arm.
1984 (Nineteen Eighty-Four)
Part 1, Chapter 3.
"Who controls the past", ran the Party slogan, "controls the future: who controls the present controls the past."
1984 (Nineteen Eighty-Four)
Part 1, Chapter 3.
Comrade Ogilvy, who had never existed in the present, now existed in the past, and when once the act of forgery was forgotten, he would exist just as authentically, and upon the same evidence, as Charlemagne or Julius Caesar.
1984 (Nineteen Eighty-Four)
Part 1, Chapter 4.
Don't you see that the whole aim of Newspeak is to narrow the range of thoght? In the end we shall make thoughtcrime literally impossible, because there will be no words in which to express it.
1984 (Nineteen Eighty-Four)
Syme to Winston, Part 1, Chapter 5.
Your worst enemy, he reflected, was your own nervous system. At any moment the tension inside you was liable to translate itself into some visible symptom.
1984 (Nineteen Eighty-Four)
Winston reflects, Part 1, Chapter 6.
Sexual intercourse was to be looked on as a slightly disgusting minor operation, like having an enema.
1984 (Nineteen Eighty-Four)
Winston describes Party bid to kill the sex instinct, Part 1, Chapter 6.
She had not a thought in her head that was not a slogan, and there was no imbecility, absolutely none, that she was not capable of swallowing if the Party handed it out to her.
1984 (Nineteen Eighty-Four)
Winston thinks about Katharine, Part 1, Chapter 6.
If there is hope, wrote Winston, it lies in the proles.
1984 (Nineteen Eighty-Four)
Writing in his diary, Part 1, Chapter 7.
Until they become conscious they will never rebel, and until after they have rebelled they cannot become conscious.
1984 (Nineteen Eighty-Four)
Winston writing on the proles, Part 1, Chapter 7.
They were born, they grew up in the gutters, they went to work at twelve, they passed through a brief blossoming period of beauty and sexual desire, they married at twenty, they were middle-aged at thirty, they died, for the most part, at sixty. Heavy physical work, the care of home and children, petty quarrels with neighbors, films, football, beer, and, above all, gambling filled up the horizon of their minds.
1984 (Nineteen Eighty-Four)
The Proles, described by Winston, Part 1, Chapter 7.
A nation of warriors and fanatics, marching forward in perfect unity, all thinking the same thoughts and shouting the same slogans, perpetually working, fighting, triumphing, persecuting - three hundred million people all with the same face.
1984 (Nineteen Eighty-Four)
The ideal set up by the Party, according to Winston, Part 1, Chapter 7.
Under the spreading chestnut tree
I sold you and you sold me:
There lie they, and here lie we
Under the spreading chestnut tree.
1984 (Nineteen Eighty-Four)
Voice singing from telescreen, Part 1, Chapter 7.
Freedom is the freedom to say that two plus two make four. If that is granted, all else follows.
1984 (Nineteen Eighty-Four)
Winston writing, Part 1, Chapter 7.
The Lottery, with its weekly pay-out of enormous prizes, was the one public event to which the proles paid serious attention ... It was their delight, their folly, their anodyne, their intellectual stimulant ... the prizes were largely imaginary. Only small sums were actually paid out, the winners of the big prizes being non-existent persons.
1984 (Nineteen Eighty-Four)
Part 1, Chapter 8.
It seemed to him that he knew exactly what it felt like to sit in a room like this, in an armchair beside an open fire with your feet in the fender and a kettle on the hob: utterly alone, utterly secure, with nobody watching you, no voice pursuing you, no sound except the singing of the kettle and the friendly ticking of the clock.
1984 (Nineteen Eighty-Four)
Winston's feelings in room above junk-shop in prole quarters, Part 1, Chapter 8.
Oranges and lemons, say the bells of St Clement's, You owe me three farthings, say the bells of St Martin's.
1984 (Nineteen Eighty-Four)
Junk shop proprieter to Winston, Part 1, Chapter 8.
At the sight of the words I love you the desire to stay alive had welled up in him, and the taking of minor risks suddenly seemed stupid.
1984 (Nineteen Eighty-Four)
Words on note handed to Winston by Julia, Part 2, Chapter 1.
Winston and Julia clung together, fascinated. The music went on and on, minute after minute, with astonishing variations, never once repeating itself, almost as though the bird were deliberately showing off its virtuosity. Sometimes it stopped for a few seconds, spread out and resettled its wings, then swelled its speckled breast and again burst into song. Winston watched it with a sort of vague reverence. For whom, for what, was that bird singing? No mate, no rival was watching it. What made it sit at the edge of the lonely wood and pour its music into nothingness?
1984 (Nineteen Eighty-Four)
Part 2, Chapter 2.
Not merely the love of one person, but the animal instinct, the simple undifferentiated desire: that was the force that would tear the Party to pieces.
1984 (Nineteen Eighty-Four)
Part 2, Chapter 2.
To be bought furtively by proletarian youths who were under the impression that they were buying something illegal.
1984 (Nineteen Eighty-Four)
The cheap pornography turned out by Pornosec for the proles, Part 2, Chapter 3.
What was more important was that sexual privation induced hysteria, which was desirable because it could be transformed into war fever and leader worship.
1984 (Nineteen Eighty-Four)
The inner meaning of the Party's sexual puritanism, explained by Julia, Part 2, Chapter 3.
She did not understand that there was no such thing as happiness, that the only victory lay in the far future, long after you were dead, that from the moment of declaring war on the Party it was better to think of yourself as a corpse. "We are the dead," he said."
1984 (Nineteen Eighty-Four)
Julia and Winston, Part 2, Chapter 3.
The smell of her hair, the taste of her mouth, the feeling of her skin seemed to have got inside him, or into the air all around him. She had become a physical necessity.
1984 (Nineteen Eighty-Four)
Winston's desire for Julia, Part 2, Chapter 4.
1984 Part 2, Chapter 5 - Part 3, Chapter 6 More Nineteen Eighty-Four quotes
Nineteen Eighty-Four (1984), a 1949 novel about life under a futuristic totalitarian regime, was written by English writer George Orwell. Orwell was born on June 25, 1903, and died January 21, 1950.


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