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Authors: Great Expectations Quotes, Great Expectations Important Quotes, Quotations, Sayings from Charles Dickens novel
Related Quotes:   David Copperfield
Some medical beast had revived tar-water in those days as a fine medicine, and Mrs. Joe always kept a supply of it in the cupboard; having a belief in its virtues correspondent to its nastiness. At the best of times, so much of this elixir was administered to me as a choice restorative, that I was conscious of going about, smelling like a new fence.
Great Expectations
The narrator Pip, Chapter 2.
Mrs. Joe was a very clean housekeeper, but had an exquisite art of making her cleanliness more uncomfortable and unacceptable than dirt itself.
Great Expectations
Chapter 4.
I was always treated as if I had insisted on being born, in opposition to the dictates of reason, religion, and morality, and against the dissuading arguments of my best friends.
Great Expectations
The narrator Pip, Chapter 4.
In a word, I was too cowardly to do what I knew to be right, as I had been too cowardly to avoid doing what I knew to be wrong.
Great Expectations
The narrator Pip, Chapter 6.
In the little world in which children have their existence whosoever brings them up, there is nothing so finely perceived and so finely felt, as injustice. It may be only small injustice that the child can be exposed to; but the child is small, and its world is small, and its rocking-horse stands as many hands high, according to scale, as a big-boned Irish hunter.
Great Expectations
Chapter 8.
If you can't get to be oncommon through going straight, you'll never get to do it through going crooked.
Great Expectations
Joe Gargery, referring to Pip's lies, Chapter 9.
That was a memorable day to me, for it made great changes in me. But, it is the same with any life. Imagine one selected day struck out of it, and think how different its course would have been. Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation of the first link on one memorable day.
Great Expectations
Chapter 9.
There have been occasions in my later life (I suppose as in most lives) when I have felt for a time as if a thick curtain had fallen on all its interest and romance, to shut me out from anything save dull endurance any more. Never has that curtain dropped so heavy and blank, as when my way in life lay stretched out straight before me through the newly-entered road of apprenticeship to Joe.
Great Expectations
Chapter 14.
What would it signify to me, being coarse and common, if nobody had told me so!
Great Expectations
Pip confides to Biddy, Chapter 17.
Now, I return to this young fellow. And the communication I have got to make is, that he has great expectations.
Great Expectations
Mr Jaggers about Pip, Chapter 18.
...feeling it very sorrowful and strange that this first night of my bright fortunes should be the loneliest I had ever known.
Great Expectations
Chapter 18.
Heaven knows we need never be ashamed of our tears, for they are rain upon the blinding dust of earth, overlying our hard hearts.
Great Expectations
Chapter 19.
Take another glass of wine, and excuse my mentioning that society as a body does not expect one to be so strictly conscientious in emptying one's glass, as to turn it bottom upwards with the rim on one's nose.
Great Expectations
Herbert Pocket to Pip, Chapter 22.
No man who was not a true gentleman at heart, ever was, since the world began, a true gentleman in manner... no varnish can hide the grain of the wood; and that the more varnish you put on, the more the grain will express itself.
Great Expectations
Herbert Pocket to Pip, Chapter 22.
My guiding star always is, Get hold of portable property.
Great Expectations
Wemmick to Pip, Chapter 24.
Throughout life, our worst weaknesses and meannesses are usually committed for the sake of the people whom we most despise.
Great Expectations
Chapter 27.
Pip, dear old chap, life is made of ever so many partings welded together.
Great Expectations
Joe Gargery to Pip, Chapter 27.
One man's a blacksmith, and one's a whitesmith, and one's a goldsmith, and one's a coppersmith.
Great Expectations
Joe to Pip, Chapter 27.
All other swindlers upon earth are nothing to the self-swindlers, and with such pretenses did I cheat myself. Surely a curious thing. That I should innocently take a bad half-crown of somebody else's manufacture, is reasonable enough; but that I should knowingly reckon the spurious coin of my own make, as good money!
Great Expectations
Chaper 28.
How strange it was that I should be encompassed by all this taint of prison and crime; that in my childhood out on our lonely marshes on a winter evening I should have first encountered it; that it should have reappeared on two occasions, starting out like a stain that was faded but not gone; that it should in this new way pervade my fortune and advancement.
Great Expectations
Pip thinking, Chapter 32.
We spent as much money as we could, and got as little for it as people could make up their minds to give us. We were always more or less miserable, and most of our acquaintance were in the same condition. There was a gay fiction among us that we were constantly enjoying ourselves, and a skeleton truth that we never did. To the best of my belief, our case was in the last aspect a rather common one.
Great Expectations
Chapter 34.
So now, as an infallible way of making little ease great ease, I began to contract a quantity of debt.
Great Expectations
Chapter 34.
I never had one hour's happiness in her society, and yet my mind all round the four-and-twenty hours was harping on the happiness of having her with me unto death.
Great Expectations
Narrator Pip on Estella, Chapter 38.
'So,' said Estella, 'I must be taken as I have been made. The success is not mine, the failure is not mine, but the two together make me.'
Great Expectations
Chapter 38.
All the truth of my position came flashing on me; and its disappointments, dangers, disgraces, consequences of all kinds, rushed in in such a multitude that I was borne down by them and had to struggle for every breath I drew.
Great Expectations
Chapter 39.
I would not have gone back to Joe now, I would not have gone back to Biddy now, for any consideration: simply, I suppose, because my sense of my own worthless conduct to them was greater than every consideration. No wisdom on earth could have given me the comfort that I should have derived from their simplicity and fidelity; but I could never, never, never, undo what I had done.
Great Expectations
Chapter 39.
Take nothing on its looks; take everything on evidence. There's no better rule.
Great Expectations
Mr Jaggers to Pip, Chapter 40.
The imaginary student pursued by the misshapen creature he had impiously made, was not more wretched than I, pursued by the creature who had made me, and recoiling from him with a stronger repulsion, the more he admired me and the fonder he was of me.
Great Expectations
Pip's thoughts when convict Magwitch moves in with him and gets Pip to read to him, Chapter 40.
Compeyson's business was the swindling, hand writing forging, stolen bank-note passing, and such-like. All sorts of traps as Compeyson could set with his head, and keep his own legs out of and get the profits from and let another man in for, was Compeyson's business. He'd no more heart than a iron file he was as cold as death, and he had the head of the Devil afore mentioned.
Great Expectations
Chapter 42.
It would have been cruel in Miss Havisham, horribly cruel, to practice on the susceptibility of a poor boy, and to torture me through all these years with a vain hope and an idle pursuit, if she had reflected on the gravity of what she did. But I think she did not.
Great Expectations
Chapter 44.
It was understood that nothing of a tender nature could possibly be confided to old Barley, by reason of his being totally unequal to the consideration of any subject more psychological than Gout, Rum, and Purser's stores.
Great Expectations
Chapter 46.
I knew not how to answer, or how to comfort her. That she had done a grievous thing in taking an impressionable child to mould into the form that her wild resentment, spurned affection, and wounded pride, found vengeance in, I knew full well. But that, in shutting out the light of day, she had shut out infinitely more; that, in seclusion, she had secluded herself from a thousand natural and healing influences; that, her mind, brooding solitary, had grown diseased, as all minds do and must and will that reverse the appointed order of their Maker; I knew equally well.
Great Expectations
Narrator Pip on Miss Havisham, Chapter 49.
And could I look upon her without compassion, seeing her punishment in the ruin she was, in her profound unfitness for this earth on which she was placed, in the vanity of sorrow which had become a master mania, like the vanity of penitence, the vanity of remorse, the vanity of unworthiness, and other monstrous vanities that have been curses in this world?
Great Expectations
Narrator Pip on Miss Havisham, Chapter 49.
It was one of those March days when the sun shines hot and the wind blows cold: when it is summer in the light, and winter in the shade.
Great Expectations
Chapter 54.
For now my repugnance to him had all melted away, and in the hunted, wounded, shackled creature who held my hand in his, I only saw a man who had meant to be my benefactor, and who had felt affectionately, gratefully, and generously, towards me with great constancy through a series of years. I only saw in him a much better man than I had been to Joe.
Great Expectations
Pip on his changed feelings for Magwitch, Chapter 54.
I took her hand in mine, and we went out of the ruined place; and, as the morning mists had risen long ago when I first left the forge, so, the evening mists were rising now, and in all the broad expanse of tranquil light they showed to me, I saw no shadow of another parting from her..
Great Expectations
Last lines of novel as Pip takes Estalla's hand and they walk together, Chapter 59.
Great Expectations is a novel by English-born writer Charles Dickens published in serial form in 1860-1861. Regarded as one of his greatest and most sophisticated novels, it's central theme - how do men know who they are? - is one that preoccupied Dickens towards the end of his life. Dickens was born on February 7, 1912, and died on June 9, 1870.


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