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Authors: Animal Farm Quotes, Famous Animal Farm Quotes, Quotations, Sayings
Related Quotes:   1984 (Nineteen Eighty-Four)
Man is the only real enemy we have. Remove Man from the scene, and the root cause of hunger and overwork is abolished forever.
Animal Farm
Major, Chapter 1.
Man is the only creature that consumes without producing. He does not give milk, he does not lay eggs, he is too weak to pull the plough, he cannot run fast enough to catch rabbits. Yet he is lord of all the animals. He sets them to work, he gives back to them the bare minimum that will prevent them from starving, and the rest he keeps for himself.
Animal Farm
Major, Chapter 1.
Remember, comrades, your resolution must never falter. No argument must lead you astray. Never listen when they tell you that Man and the animals have a common interest, that the prosperity of the one is the prosperity of the others. It is all lies. Man serves the interests of no creature except himself. And among us animals let there be perfect unity, perfect comradeship in the struggle. All men are enemies. All animals are comrades.
Animal Farm
Major, Chapter 1.
In fighting against Man, we must not come to resemble him. Even when you have conquered him, do not adopt his vices. No animal must ever live in a house, or sleep in a bed, or wear clothes, or drink
alcohol, or smoke tobacco, or touch money, or engage in trade.
Animal Farm
Major, Chapter 1.
THE SEVEN COMMANDMENTS
1. Whatever goes upon two legs is an enemy.
2. Whatever goes upon four legs, or has wings, is a friend.
3. No animal shall wear clothes.
4. No animal shall sleep in a bed.
5. No animal shall drink alcohol.
6. No animal shall kill any other animal.
7. All animals are equal.
Animal Farm
Chapter 2.
The animals were happy as they had never conceived it possible to be. Every mouthful of food was an acute positive pleasure, now that it was truly their own food, produced by themselves and for themselves, not doled out to them by a grudging master.
Animal Farm
Chapter 3.
Nobody stole, nobody grumbled over his rations, the quarrelling and biting and jealousy which had been normal features of life in the old days had almost disappeared.
Animal Farm
Chapter 3.
I will work harder!
Animal Farm
Boxer's motto, Chapter 3.
FOUR LEGS GOOD, TWO LEGS BAD.
Animal Farm
Maxim devised by Snowball, Chapter 3.
It was given out that the animals there practised cannibalism, tortured one another with red-hot horseshoes, and had their females in common. This was what came of rebelling against the laws of Nature, Frederick and Pilkington said.
Animal Farm
Chapter 4.
"I have no wish to take life, not even human life," repeated Boxer, and his eyes were full of tears.
Animal Farm
Chapter 4.
Do not imagine, comrades, that leadership is a pleasure. No one believes more firmly than Comrade Napoleon that all animals are equal. He would be only too happy to let you make your decisions for yourselves. But sometimes you might make the wrong decisions, comrades, and then where should we be?
Animal Farm
Squealer, Chapter 5.
Napoleon is always right.
Animal Farm
Boxer, Chapter 5.
All that year the animals worked like slaves. But they were happy in their work; they grudged no effort or sacrifice, well aware that everything they did was for the benefit of themselves and those of their kind who would come after them, and not for a pack of idle, thieving human beings.
Animal Farm
Chapter 6.

Once again the animals were conscious of a vague uneasiness. Never to have any dealings with human beings, never to engage in trade, never to make use of money - had not these been among the earliest resolutions passed at that first triumphant Meeting after Jones was expelled?
Animal Farm
Chapter 6.

The human beings did not hate Animal Farm any less now that it was prospering; indeed, they hated it more than ever.
Animal Farm
Chapter 6.
Every human being held it as an article of faith that the farm would go bankrupt sooner or later, and, above all, that the windmill would be a failure. They would meet in the public-houses and prove to one another by means of diagrams that the windmill was bound to fall down, or that if it did stand up, then that it would never work. And yet, against their will, they had developed a certain respect for the efficiency with which the animals were managing their own affairs.
Animal Farm
Chapter 6.
They were always cold, and usually hungry as well.
Animal Farm
Chapter 7.
Whenever anything went wrong it became usual to attribute it to Snowball. If a window was broken or a drain was blocked up, someone was certain to say that Snowball had come in the night and done it, and when the key of the store-shed was lost, the whole farm was convinced that Snowball had thrown it down the well. Curiously enough, they went on believing this even after the mislaid key was found under a sack of meal.
Animal Farm
Chapter 7.
And so the tale of confessions and executions went on, until there was a pile of corpses lying before Napoleon's feet and the air was heavy with the smell of blood, which had been unknown there since the expulsion of Jones.
Animal Farm
Chapter 7.
If she herself had had any picture of the future, it had been of a society of animals set free from hunger and the whip, all equal, each working according to his capacity, the strong protecting the weak.
Animal Farm
A tearful Clover after the slaughter of the pigs and hens, Chapter 7.
They had come to a time when no one dared speak his mind, when fierce, growling dogs roamed everywhere, and when you had to watch your comrades torn to pieces after confessing to shocking crimes.
Animal Farm
Chapter 7.
Some of the animals remembered - or thought they remembered - that the Sixth Commandment decreed "No animal shall kill any other animal." And though no one cared to mention it in the hearing of the pigs or the dogs, it was felt that the killings which had taken place did not square with this.
Animal Farm
Chapter 8.
Muriel read the Commandment for her. It ran: "No animal shall kill any other animal WITHOUT CAUSE." Somehow or other, the last two words had slipped out of the animals' memory.
Animal Farm
Chapter 8.
It had become usual to give Napoleon the credit for every successful achievement and every stroke of good fortune. You would often hear one hen remark to another, "Under the guidance of our Leader, Comrade Napoleon, I have laid five eggs in six days"; or two cows, enjoying a drink at the pool, would exclaim, "Thanks to the leadership of Comrade Napoleon, how excellent this water tastes!"
Animal Farm
Chapter 8.
They had thought the Fifth Commandment was "No animal shall drink alcohol," but there were two words that they had forgotten. Actually the Commandment read: "No animal shall drink alcohol TO EXCESS."
Animal Farm
Chapter 8.
Reading out the figures in a shrill, rapid voice, he proved to them in detail that they had more oats, more hay, more turnips than they had had in Jones's day, that they worked shorter hours, that their drinking water was of better quality, that they lived longer, that a larger proportion of their young ones survived infancy, and that they had more straw in their stalls and suffered less from fleas.
Animal Farm
Squealer explains the "readjustment" of rations, Chapter 9.
Besides, in those days they had been slaves and now they were free, and that made all the difference, as Squealer did not fail to point out.
Animal Farm
Chapter 9.
But the luxuries of which Snowball had once taught the animals to dream, the stalls with electric light and hot and cold water, and the three-day week, were no longer talked about. Napoleon had denounced such ideas as contrary to the spirit of Animalism. The truest happiness, he said, lay in working hard and living frugally.
Animal Farm
Chapter 10.
Somehow it seemed as though the farm had grown richer without making the animals themselves any richer-except, of course, for the pigs and the dogs.
Animal Farm
Chapter 10.
Only old Benjamin professed to remember every detail of his long life and to know that things never had been, nor ever could be much better or much worse - hunger, hardship and disappointment being, so he said, the unalterable law of life.
Animal Farm
Chapter 10.
Four legs good, two legs better!
Animal Farm
Sheep burst out bleating this over and over, Chapter 10.
ALL ANIMALS ARE EQUAL
BUT SOME ANIMALS ARE MORE EQUAL THAN OTHERS.
Animal Farm
This single commandment replaces the original Seven Commandments, Chapter 10.
No question now, what had happened to the faces of the pigs. The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again; but already it was impossible to say which was which.
Animal Farm
Closing words of the novella, Chapter 10.
Animal Farm, a novella by George Orwell and the most famous satirical allegory of Soviet totalitarianism, was published in 1945. An English writer, Orwell was born on June 25, 1903, and died on January 21, 1950.


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