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Authors: Pride and Prejudice Quotes, Famous Pride and Prejudice Quotes, Quotations, Sayings from Chapters 1-15
Related Quotes:   Sense and Sensibility
Pride and Prejudice, Chapters, 16-33   Pride and Prejudice, Chapters 34-60
It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.
Pride and Prejudice
Opening sentence of novel, Chapter 1.
She was a woman of mean understanding, little information, and uncertain temper.
Pride and Prejudice
About Mrs. Bennett, Chapter 1.
The business of her life was to get her daughters married.
Pride and Prejudice
About Mrs. Bennett, Chapter 1.
The gentlemen pronounced him to be a fine figure of a man, the ladies declared he was much handsomer than Mr. Bingley, and he was looked at with great admiration for about half the evening, till his manners gave a disgust which tuned the tide of his popularity; for he was discovered to be proud, to be above his company, and above being pleased; and not all his large estate in Derbyshire could then save him from having a most forbidding, disagreeable countenance, and being unworthy to be compared with his friend.
Pride and Prejudice
Other characters' reaction to Mr. Darcy, Chapter 3.
She is tolerable, I suppose, but not handsome enough to tempt me; I am in no humour at present to give consequence to young ladies who are slighted by other men. You had better return to your partner and enjoy her smiles, for you are wasting your time with me.
Pride and Prejudice
Mr. Darcy to Mr. Bingley about Elizabeth Bennet, Chapter 3.
"But I can assure you," she added, "that Lizzy does not lose much by not suiting his fancy; for he is a most disagreeable, horrid man, not at all worth pleasing. So high and so conceited that there was no enduring him! He walked here, and he walked there, fancying himself so very great! Not handsome enough to dance with! I wish you had been there, my dear, to have given him one of your set-downs. I quite detest the man."
Pride and Prejudice
Mrs. Bennet to Mr. Bennet about Mr. Darcy, Chapter 3.
"Oh! you are a great deal too apt, you know, to like people in general. You never see a fault in anybody. All the world are good and agreeable in your eyes. I never heard you speak ill of a human being in your life."
"I would not wish to be hasty in censuring anyone; but I always speak what I think."
"I know you do; and it is that which makes the wonder. With your good sense, to be so honestly blind to the follies and nonsense of others! Affectation of candour is common enough — one meets with it everywhere. But to be candid without ostentation or design — to take the good of everybody's character and make it still better, and say nothing of the bad — belongs to you alone. And so you like this man's sisters, too, do you? Their manners are not equal to his."
Pride and Prejudice
Elizabeth Bennett to her sister Jane, Chapter 4.
I could easily forgive his pride, if he had not mortified mine.
Pride and Prejudice
Elizabeth about Darcy, Chapter 5.
Vanity and pride are different things, though the words are often used synonymously. A person may be proud without being vain. Pride relates more to our opinion of ourselves, vanity to what we would have others think of us.
Pride and Prejudice
Mary Bennett, Chapter 5.
If a woman is partial to a man, and does not endeavour to conceal it, he must find it out.
Pride and Prejudice
Elizabeth, Chapter 6.
Happiness in marriage is entirely a matter of chance. If the dispositions of the parties are ever so well known to each other or ever so similar beforehand, it does not advance their felicity in the least. They always continue to grow sufficiently unlike afterwards to have their share of vexation; and it is better to know as little as possible of the defects of the person with whom you are to pass your life.
Pride and Prejudice
Charlotte Lucas, Chapter 6.
Occupied in observing Mr. Bingley's attentions to her sister, Elizabeth was far from suspecting that she was herself becoming an object of some interest in the eyes of his friend. Mr. Darcy had at first scarcely allowed her to be pretty; he had looked at her without admiration at the ball; and when they next met, he looked at her only to criticise. But no sooner had he made it clear to himself and his friends that she hardly had a good feature in her face, than he began to find it was rendered uncommonly intelligent by the beautiful expression of her dark eyes. To this discovery succeeded some others equally mortifying. Though he had detected with a critical eye more than one failure of perfect symmetry in her form, he was forced to acknowledge her figure to be light and pleasing; and in spite of his asserting that her manners were not those of the fashionable world, he was caught by their easy playfulness. Of this she was perfectly unaware; to her he was only the man who made himself agreeable nowhere, and who had not thought her handsome enough to dance with.
Pride and Prejudice
Chapter 6.
I have been meditating on the very great pleasure which a pair of fine eyes in the face of a pretty woman can bestow.
Pride and Prejudice
Darcy to Miss Bingley, Chapter 6.
A lady's imagination is very rapid; it jumps from admiration to love, from love to matrimony, in a moment.
Pride and Prejudice
Elizabeth, Chapter 6.
No one can be really esteemed accomplished who does not greatly surpass what is usually met with.
Pride and Prejudice
Caroline Bingley, Chapter 8.
"Nothing is more deceitful," said Darcy, "than the appearance of humility. It is often only carelessness of opinion, and sometimes an indirect boast."
Pride and Prejudice
Chapter 10.
The power of doing anything with quickness is always prized much by the possessor, and often without any attention to the imperfection of the performance.
Pride and Prejudice
Darcy, Chapter 10.
You expect me to account for opinions which you choose to call mine, but which I have never acknowledged.
Pride and Prejudice
Darcy to Elizabeth, Chapter 10.
"To yield readily - easily - to the persuasion of a friend is no merit."
"To yield without conviction is no compliment to the understanding of either."
"You appear to me, Mr. Darcy, to allow nothing for the influence of friendship and affection."
Pride and Prejudice
Elizabeth and Darcy, Chapter 10.
She hardly knew how to suppose that she could be an object of admiration to so great a man.
Pride and Prejudice
Elizabeth about Darcy fixing his eyes on her, Chapter 10.
Elizabeth, having rather expected to affront him, was amazed at his gallantry; but there was a mixture of sweetness and archness in her manner which made it difficult for her to affront anybody; and Darcy had never been so bewitched by any woman as he was by her. He really believed, that were it not for the inferiority of her connections, he should be in some danger.
Pride and Prejudice
Chapter 10.
I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading! How much sooner one tires of anything than of a book! When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable if I have not an excellent library.
Pride and Prejudice
Miss Bingley, Chapter 11.
My good opinion once lost, is lost forever.
Pride and Prejudice
Darcy, Chapter 11.
There is, I believe, in every disposition a tendency to some particular evil — a natural defect, which not even the best education can overcome.
Pride and Prejudice
Darcy, Chapter 11.
It is happy for you that you possess the talent of flattering with delicacy. May I ask whether these pleasing attentions proceed from the impulse of the moment, or are the result of previous study?
Pride and Prejudice
Mr. Bennett, Chapter 14.
Mr. Collins was not a sensible man, and the deficiency of nature had been but little assisted by education or society.
Pride and Prejudice
Chapter 15.
Mr. Collins had only to change from Jane to Elizabeth — and it was soon done — done while Mrs. Bennet was stirring the fire.
Pride and Prejudice
Chapter 15.
In his library he had always been always sure of leisure and tranquillity; and though prepared ... to meet with folly and conceit in every other room in the house, he was used to be free of them there.
Pride and Prejudice
About Mr. Bennett, Chapter 15.
Pride and Prejudice Chapters, 16-33   Pride and Prejudice Chapters, 34-60
Pride and Prejudice, a romantic comedy novel, was written by English author Jane Austen. Published in 1813, it is the most famous novel by Austen, who was born on December 16, 1775, and died on July 18, 1717.


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